This week on Humans Of UTSC:

Kosan

 

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“I’ve always looked much older than I actually am. I think the fact that I look older has forced me to grow up before anyone else my age did. It affected a lot of things in terms of who I became friends and who I connected with. I always connected better with people who were older than I was. Everyone tells me that I am maternal and I feel like that is something that has affected me and how I behaved towards myself. I expect more out of myself now. I try to be more mature. I’m not complaining, but I think I reminisce about my childhood more than other people do.”

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This week on Humans of UTSC:

Professor Steve Joordens

“Early on, what I always wanted to be and what I still want to be in the back of my mind is a person who produces records. So working in a studio. I always liked music a lot, got a lot into music. I had no musical skill; we now play but that started just around 10 years ago or so. But I always thought it would be really cool to be working in a studio, have these musicians come, meet them, get to hang out with them. And I did psychology originally because I thought what a producer does is help them take whatever they have and make it better, where better means connect better with the audience. So I thought if I understood psychology that would be a great basis for being a producer. Working both with the bands effectively, managing a band, but also helping them reach their audience. That all sounded like psychology to me.”

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For more Humans of UTSC posts visit their Facebook page at :https://www.facebook.com/humansofutsc

 

This week on Humans of UTSC:

Maitri Gupta

“I am like a chameleon. I can always find common ground with other people, whether it is over music or movies or the healthcare system. I think every person you meet is a new opportunity to find yourself. When you allow yourself to fit in with different people – to be a chameleon – you are allowing yourself to learn more from those people. People are really malleable and it is the new experiences with new people that help us learn and grow and talk about things we might not have ever talked about before. Being different versions of yourself while finding common ground doesn’t mean you aren’t being true to yourself. Just because I am not talking about the things that I usually talk about or things I’m not usually interested in doesn’t mean I am not being me. I don’t let my interests define me. They could give away the type of person that I am, but they do not limit me. I am undefined. I can identify with a lot of things, but I don’t let anything define me.”
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For more Humans of UTSC posts visit their Facebook page at :https://www.facebook.com/humansofutsc